Videos

Yana
Dekempeneer
VUB

Cancer-free thanks to the camel?

Yana Dekempeneer is looking for a new, more effective method of treating breast cancer and she's putting her hope on camels... 
Alexandre
Chevalier
KBIN

Knowing the past to predict the future

Alexandre Chevalier studies plants from the past. He is convinced that this knowledge can help us to grow food in a more sustainable way.
Quentin
Goffette
KBIN

Did our ancestors fancy birds for dinner?

Nowadays, 98 million tons of chicken are consumed every year, making it the second most consumed meat in the world, after pork. BUt what about the past? Well, Quentin Goffette tries to find out which place birds occupied in the daily life (or menu) of our ancestors. 
Wim
Wouters
KBIN

Fish bones: more than a detail in archeology!

"The study of a simple fishbone, provides us with a lot of insights on economic, ecologic and social level." Needless to say Wim Wouters is a fan of fish bones. He investigates fish remains from numerous archeological sites in order to reconstruct the history of fishing. 
Gontran
Sonet
KBIN

Why explore the DNA in museum specimens?

Gontran Sonet explains why it is important for the Museum of Natural Sciences to have large collections of specimens. They are paramount to gain better understanding of our fascinating planet.
Tara
Chapman
KBIN

Did Neandertals breakdance?

Were Neandertals able to breakdance? We bet you never thought of that question before, but that you're dying to know the answer by now. Well, Tara Chapman virtually (re)constructs skeletons of Neandertals and fuses them to movement of modern human to find out how they could have moved about.
Lien
Speleers
KBIN

What plant remains tell us about the history of Brussels

Cesspits, you undoubtedly prefer to leave them closed. But that's not the case with 'plant archeologist' Lien Speleers. For her, cesspools offer treasures of information that help her to reconstruct the history of Brussels.
Kristel
Paque
UGent
VUB

Are all those pills really needed as the end approaches?

Up to 91 pills a week. That's how many medicines people take at the end of their lives. Kristel Paque is investigating whether all these pills are really necessary.
Jiyun
Zhang
VUB

Safeguarding intangible cultural heritage

Jiyun Zhang is developing tools to safeguard intangible cultural heritage practices, such as shadow puppetry, in this era of modernization of globalisation.
Maxine
Crauwels
VUB

When good guys become bad

During cancer treatments medicines sometimes tend to remain in the kidneys of patients, which can be a problem because they can cause damage to healthy cells there. Maxine Crauwels is carrying out research to help guide the medication to the exit.  
Jessica
Bridoux
VUB

Tumours, masters in disguise

Jessica Bridoux, researcher at the University of Brussels (VUB), is developing a diagnostic tool to track tumourcells that are trying to hide from our immune system.
Kim
Bosmans
VUB

Is temporary work workable?

For her PhD Kim Bosmans researched the impact of flexible work on the mental well-being of employees.