Videos

Joke
Spildooren
UHasselt

Loose pebbles in the organ of balance will make you dizzy

What if your balance organ suddenly registers movements that aren't there? Well, you'll become dizzy, something that the elderly in particular sometimes have to contend with. This dizziness is often seen as an inevitable aging disorder. But this specific type of vertigo cán be treated, as explained by Joke Spildooren.
Danny
Vanpoucke
UHasselt

Virtual experiments with real materials

Imagine a world in which you can see and manipulate atoms of your own choice and in which you can rig the forces of nature to your liking. Danny Vanpoucke introduces you to the wonderful world of computational material research.
Dean
Paes
UHasselt

Alzheimer's disease: forget about it?

What is the link between a bucket of water and Alzheimer's disease? Dean Paes (Hasselt University & Maastricht University) will tell you all about it, as well as explain why he is looking for a molecular cork.
Jan-Pieter
Ploem
UHasselt

Flatworms help track down carcinogens!

Every year, many mice are sacrificed for science. These animals are used, among other things, to test whether certain substances are carcinogenic. Jan-Pieter Ploem is working on a new test method that uses flatworms, that will hopefully help save a lot of mice.
Melissa
Schepers
UHasselt

Cognition enhancers: key in the recovery of MS patients?

When we think of MS patients, we often think of people in a wheelchair. This is because multiple sclerosis affects the motor functions of the patient and patients do often end up in a wheelchair. Together with her UHasselt colleagues, Melissa Schepers is determined to banish that image of MS patients in a wheelchair to the past.
Gitte
Slingers
UHasselt

Wheezing and rattling. What's the problem?

Did you know that half of the children experience a period of noisy breathing in their first year of life? For a doctor it's not always easy to come to the right diagnosis. Will the research by Gitte Slingers (University of Hasselt) soon provide any relief?
Dennis
Fransen
UHasselt

Citizens and government: a game without rules?

Did you know that there is no clear, general regulation in Belgium that regulates the relationship between citizen and government? we currently rely on vague, unwritten principles supplemented by specific legislation, what has led to a jumble of rules. That tangle is what Dennis Fransen wants to help unravel. Through his research he wants to contribute to a general administrative law code in Belgium and Flanders.
Els
Knippenberg
UHasselt

I-ACT: a useful tool for rehabilitation

Rehabilitation centers are not equipped with enough staff to provide individual training to patients during their recovery. Occupational therapists therefore often have to treat two or three patients at the same time. With the I-Act, a technology that acts like a digital personal coach, Els Knippenberg wants to change this by offering personalised remedial therapy to patients.
Ingrid
Ruskowski
UHasselt

How internet capabilities can help your company

Marketing managers need to be close to what is going on in their market. Luckily they can rely on digital tools to help them, but it's sometimes hard to keep track as new tools pop up every day. That's why, according to Ingrid Ruskowski (Universiteit Hasselt), companies need to invest in internet capabilities. 
Hannelore
Bové
KU Leuven
UHasselt

Soot: the invisible culprit

Hannelore Bové developed a new technique that allows for the first time to detect and count the number of soot particles a person has in his or her body. This is an important step in order to determine the precise impact of soot on our health.
Elien
Derveaux
UHasselt

How lung cancer leaves useful traces in the blood

Every year about 8,000 people in Belgium develop lung cancer. These people may get the same diagnosis, but their bodies react differently. Elien Derveaux (Universiteit Hasselt) examines whether, on the basis of these differences, we can predict which treatment is most suitable for the patient.
Leila
Paquay
UHasselt

Industrial hemp's unexpected friends

Leila Paquay turns to funghi and bacteria to grow high-quality industrial hemp - not to be confused with drug type cannabis.