Videos

Koen
Wouters
UHasselt

Can bacteria reduce electronic waste?

In 2012, scientists found interesting bacteria in the mud of the North Sea. Further investigation showed that these bacteria conduct electricity, just like power cables. But how exactly do these bacteria do this? And does this offer potential for more clean electronics? This is what Koen Wouters (UHasselt) and his colleagues are investigating.
Sajib
Chakraborty
VUB

Are electric vehicles safe with new semiconductors? Let digital twins decide

"As researchers, we are not lucky enough to have the budget to crash hundreds of vehicles to test a new technology." So how can researchers test whether a new tiny semiconductor is safe to use in electric vehicles? For this, Sajib Chakraborty (VUB) developed a digital twin. A what? Watch the video to find out more.
Sidney
Goossens
VUB

A nervous system of glass fibers will allow airplanes to feel

The next generation of airplanes will be able to feel when they suffer damage, thanks to a nervous system of glass fibers. Engineer Sidney Goossens (VUB) is developing this technology to make airplanes safer & eco-friendlier. Watch the video to find out how he moves forth.
Clement
Jacquot
VITO

3D printing and accelerators to improve chemical production

Real almonds are expensive. That's why products such as marzipan are sometimes made with synthetic almond flavour. For this, two elements are important: a reactor in which to make these synthetic almond molecules and a catalyst to speed up the chemical reaction. Chemical engineer & marzipan lover Clement Jacquot tells you more about his clever idea to produce more of this synthetic almond flavour, in a much faster way!
Yoran
De Vos
VITO

A sponge to tackle climate change

Wouldn't it be nice if we could use a sponge to suck carbon dioxide out of the air and help stop global warming? That's what Yoran De Vos (VITO) is hoping to achieve. But his sponge is nothing like an ordinary kitchen sponge.
Awadesh
Mallik
FWO
imec
UHasselt

Growing diamonds for cool electronics

Diamonds are not only a girl's best friend (M. Monroe), but they're also an engineer's best friend (A. Mallik). Awadesh Mallik (Universiteit Hasselt - imec) explains why that is and how engineers grow diamonds in the lab. 👨🏽‍🔬 💎
Pieter
Verding
FWO
UHasselt

No dirty glasses anymore!

Pieter Verding wants to make your life easier. His goal: to make sure you no longer have to clean your windows or glasses. How? Well, by developing self-cleaning coatings 👇 🎥
Jonathan
Op de Beeck
FWO
imec
KU Leuven

How to see the invisible?

Have you ever tried to look at something, but it was too small to see? Well, scientists improving your smartphone are facing this issue on a daily basis. Jonathan Op de Beeck (imec - KU Leuven) explains how they are able to 'see' the invisible.
Andrea
Itziar Pitillas Martinez
imec
KU Leuven
UGent

How can we build the batteries of the future?

Can you imagine a future where you could travel from Liverpool to London in a fully electric flying taxi in one hour? Andre Pitillas (Imec & Ku Leuven) is working on the 'batteries of the future' that will help make this happen.
Boshen
Liang
imec
KU Leuven

How to be prepared for the next pandemic

Wouldn't it be great if you could have your own virus detection facility at home, or even in your pocket? That's what Boshen Liang & his colleagues at imec & Ku Leuven are working on via so-called lab-on-chip technology.
Robin
Bonné
FWO
UHasselt

Can you build a smartphone from bacteria?

Last year, scientists discovered bacteria in the mud of the North Sea that can conduct electricity. Robin Bonné (Hasselt University - FWO) is investigating whether we can use these 'cable bacteria' to create biodegradable electronic wires.
Nick
Gys
UAntwerpen
VITO

Your smartphone is a gold mine

Did you know that your smartphone contains, among many other precious metals, about 20 milligrams of gold? That may not seem like much, but it's 200 times as much gold as in a small piece of gold ore. Nick Gys (UAntwerpen - VITO) is working on a technique to easily recycle these precious metals from smartphones.