Videos

Ovia Margaret
Thirukkumaran
KU Leuven

HER2 breast cancer: comprehend to conquer it!

Did you know that breast cancer is the second most common cancer for women, affecting 1.7 million women worldwide? In her research Ovia Margaret Thirukkumaran is trying to decipher how cancer cells communicate and develop resistance against drugs in so called HER 2 breast cancer, a very aggressive form of breast cancer.
Pieter
Vanpaemel
KU Leuven
Vlerick

The social influence of digitale interfaces

Do Google Home, Alexa and Siri have a social impact on our behaviour? Can they encourage us to drive more safely or convince us to exercise more often? That is what Pieter Vanpaemel (Vlerick Business School - KU Leuven) researches in his doctorate.
Bjorn
Criel
UGent

The next generation of antibiotics: as simple as Lego?

According to the World Health Organization, antibiotic-resistant superbacteria will kill 10 million people worldwide every year by 2050. Bjorn Criel and his colleagues at Ghent University want to put a stop to this. They're counting on special allies: bacteriophages.
Lien
Speleers
KBIN

What plant remains tell us about the history of Brussels

Cesspits, you undoubtedly prefer to leave them closed. But that's not the case with 'plant archeologist' Lien Speleers. For her, cesspools offer treasures of information that help her to reconstruct the history of Brussels.
Rosalie
Coolkens
KU Leuven

How to get your school moving

Children should exercise about 60 minutes a day, but figures show that children in Belgium do not meet that standard. Rosalie Coolkens wants to use schools to help children reach that recommended hour of exercise.
Nicolas
De Neuter
UAntwerpen

Your immune system hacked

Why do some people get sick more easily than others? This is often due to differences in our immune systems. Nicolas De Neuter (UAntwerp) hopes to understand these differences, in order to develop better and more efficient personalized immune therapies.
Lore
Wyers
KU Leuven
UAntwerpen

Why do some children have difficulties walking?

Ever heard of Dravet's syndrome? This rare condition occurs in 1 in 20,000 people and causes problems with walking, among other things. Lore Wyers (UAntwerpen - KU Leuven) is going the extra mile to help children with Dravet syndrome to walk better again. The first 'step': analysing their step pattern.
Amar
van Laar
UGent

Rare sugars as the ideal sugar substitutes?

Amar Van Laar (Universiteit Gent) wil ervoor zorgen dat wij straks allemaal -zonder schuldgevoel- van onze lekkere Belgische chocolade kunnen blijven smullen. Hij zoekt daarvoor naar zogenaamde zeldzame suikers: natuurlijke suikers die gezonder zijn dat de veelgebruikte 'tafelsuiker'.
Tara
Chapman
KBIN

Did Neandertals breakdance?

Were Neandertals able to breakdance? We bet you never thought of that question before, but that you're dying to know the answer by now. Well, Tara Chapman virtually (re)constructs skeletons of Neandertals and fuses them to movement of modern human to find out how they could have moved about.
Gontran
Sonet
KBIN

Why explore the DNA in museum specimens?

Gontran Sonet explains why it is important for the Museum of Natural Sciences to have large collections of specimens. They are paramount to gain better understanding of our fascinating planet.
Wim
Wouters
KBIN

Fish bones: more than a detail in archeology!

"The study of a simple fishbone, provides us with a lot of insights on economic, ecologic and social level." Needless to say Wim Wouters is a fan of fish bones. He investigates fish remains from numerous archeological sites in order to reconstruct the history of fishing. 
Quentin
Goffette
KBIN

Did our ancestors fancy birds for dinner?

Nowadays, 98 million tons of chicken are consumed every year, making it the second most consumed meat in the world, after pork. BUt what about the past? Well, Quentin Goffette tries to find out which place birds occupied in the daily life (or menu) of our ancestors.