Videos

Alexandre
Chevalier
KBIN

Knowing the past to predict the future

Alexandre Chevalier studies plants from the past. He is convinced that this knowledge can help us to grow food in a more sustainable way.
Quentin
Goffette
KBIN

Did our ancestors fancy birds for dinner?

Nowadays, 98 million tons of chicken are consumed every year, making it the second most consumed meat in the world, after pork. BUt what about the past? Well, Quentin Goffette tries to find out which place birds occupied in the daily life (or menu) of our ancestors. 
Wim
Wouters
KBIN

Fish bones: more than a detail in archeology!

"The study of a simple fishbone, provides us with a lot of insights on economic, ecologic and social level." Needless to say Wim Wouters is a fan of fish bones. He investigates fish remains from numerous archeological sites in order to reconstruct the history of fishing. 
Gontran
Sonet
KBIN

Why explore the DNA in museum specimens?

Gontran Sonet explains why it is important for the Museum of Natural Sciences to have large collections of specimens. They are paramount to gain better understanding of our fascinating planet.
Tara
Chapman
KBIN

Did Neandertals breakdance?

Were Neandertals able to breakdance? We bet you never thought of that question before, but that you're dying to know the answer by now. Well, Tara Chapman virtually (re)constructs skeletons of Neandertals and fuses them to movement of modern human to find out how they could have moved about.
Lien
Speleers
KBIN

What plant remains tell us about the history of Brussels

Cesspits, you undoubtedly prefer to leave them closed. But that's not the case with 'plant archeologist' Lien Speleers. For her, cesspools offer treasures of information that help her to reconstruct the history of Brussels.
Antoine
Persyn
FWO
UGent
VIB

The four seasons: a challenge for our farmers

Winter, with its cold temperatures, is not the favourite season of our farmers. Certain plants and crops suffer greatly from the cold. But did you know that these plants themselves have the key to withstand the cold? Antoine Persyn explains exactly how this works.
Frone
Vandewiele
KU Leuven
VIB

The heart to the right rhythm

Frone Vandewiele investigates why not every heart beats to the right rhythm. In her research she wants to further help unravel the complex mechanism behind cardiac arrhythmias in order to help save lives.
Lauranne
Scheldeman
FWO
KU Leuven
VIB

A stroke in the picture

During a stroke, every second counts to save as many brain cells as possible. Intervention is only possible within a narrow time window of a few hours because late treatment can lead to serious complications. Is there nothing more we can do for these 'late' patients? There is, says neurologist trainee Lauranne Scheldeman!
Katrien
Van Dyck
FWO
KU Leuven
VIB

A conspiracy between two microbes

Together you are always stronger. Unfortunately, this also applies to some microbes, which can conspire to make us seriously ill. Microbiologist Katrien Van Dyck is investigating such a conspiracy between a fungus and a microbe that work together to cause a serious infection. By studying the interaction between the two, she hopes to find out how we can break their alliance.
Nena
Testelmans
KU Leuven
VIB

Organ transplants: life-saving, yet sometimes lethal

While an organ transplant will often save the life of a patient, it also leads to a higher risk of developing cancer. Nena Testelmans (KU Leuven) is determined to help unravel why transplants might induce cancer in patients.
Anneleen
Remmerie
UGent
VIB

Fatty Liver Disease: the challenge for the Western world

One in six Belgians is obese and thus runs an increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. This disease can affect the entire liver, in which case a liver transplant is needed to save the patient. Anneleen Remmerie (Ghent University - VIB) is looking for a way to combat the disease without the need for a new liver.