Videos

Mila
Marinova
KU Leuven

The psychology behind number processing

"5", "five" and "*****" are just the same, aren't they? Well, not exactly: while these symbolic and non-symbolic notations refer to the same magnitude, our brain processes the digit "5", the word "five" and the dot configuration differently. Mila Marinova looks into the psychology behind number processing. Such knowledge can help to make learning mathematics easier for children.
Rosalie
Coolkens
KU Leuven

How to get your school moving

Children should exercise about 60 minutes a day, but figures show that children in Belgium do not meet that standard. Rosalie Coolkens wants to use schools to help children reach that recommended hour of exercise.
Shauni
Van Herck
KU Leuven

Combating dyslexia with audio books

Hearing impairments play an important role in dyslexia. For example, people with dyslexia are less able to hear the subtle sound difference at the start of similar letters, such as the 'b' and the 'p'. By offering children adapted audio stories in nursery school, Shauni Van Herck wants to tackle these hearing problems at an early stage.
Carolien
Frijns
Arteveldehogeschool
KU Leuven

Equal educational opportunities in and after corona times? 👨🏽‍🏫 👩🏻‍🏫 🏫

Organizing education in corona times is quite a challenge for schools. Fortunately, the teacher training colleges and their student teachers come to the rescue via the "Small Children, Big Chances" network. Carolien Frijns (Arteveldehogeschool) explains how they offer help so that all children can receive customized support 💪 👊
Weiwei
Zhang
KU Leuven

How similar is the vocabulary of different language varieties?

A 'vector', isn't that something for mathematicians and physicists? Linguist Weiwei Zhang (KU Leuven) proves the opposite. She uses vectors to study related words and synonyms that appear in different language variants, such as "subway" in American English and "underground" in British English.
Luciana
Monteiro Krebs
KU Leuven

Recommendations in Academic Social Networks

We don't know enough about the algorithms used by Academic Social Networks and how they recommend to researchers which papers to read and which scientists to follow. What if these algorithms are unknowingly influencing researchers' activities, and in a way steer what they should work on next?
Marie-Anne
Markey
KU Leuven

Language in our brain: the power of analogy

People are very good at making analogies: our brains can very quickly see similarities between two things and then draw comparisons between them. We're so good at it that we do it unconsciously. Marie-Anne Markey (KU Leuven), with the help of Boris Johnson & Jane Austen, explains how this can be seen in our language...
Elien
Bellon
KU Leuven

Is self-knowledge the beginning of all math nodes?

Elien Bellon tries to find out how we can help children calculate better without letting them repeat math tables over and over again. Does the solution come from Socrates, who states that "true knowledge is to know oneself"?