Videos

Pieter
Vanpaemel
KU Leuven
Vlerick

The social influence of digitale interfaces

Do Google Home, Alexa and Siri have a social impact on our behaviour? Can they encourage us to drive more safely or convince us to exercise more often? That is what Pieter Vanpaemel (Vlerick Business School - KU Leuven) researches in his doctorate.
Nicholas
Vijverman
UGent
Vlerick

Circular economy: how to produce sustainably?

"If we think in circles, we start producing and consuming differently. In his research, Nicholas Vijverman (Vlerick Business School - University of Ghent) studies how we can engage everyone - from government, producer to consumer - in the circular economy. ♻️
Luca
Martulli
KU Leuven

Putting cars on a diet: discontinuous carbon fibre composites

Is it possible to make our cars lighter, and therefore more environmentally friendly, without compromising our safety? Luca Martulli (KU Leuven) turns to lightweight carbon fibre composites to do so.
Klaas
Vander Linden
KU Leuven

Plumbing in the body: a heartbreaking choice

An aortic aneurysm is a bulging of the large body artery. If such an aneurysm bursts, the patient can die. You'd think you'd better have surgery for this immediately, but such an operation is complex and risky. That is why engineer Klaas Vander Linden (KU Leuven)is trying to predict whether an aneurysm will burst.
Sarah
Vangrunderbeeck
KU Leuven

Looking inside tissue without cutting

What do bone marrow, liver and a tumor have in common? They all consist of so-called "soft tissue", which is not easily visualized by a CT scan. In order to study it, therefore, one has to extract pieces from a patient's body. Sarah Vangrunderbeeck wants to help change this.
Max
Bols
KU Leuven

Beating enzymes at chemical catalysis

To make the production of plastics and other chemical processes less energy-intensive and waste-producing, Max Bols turns to nature. Enzymes, the catalysts of living cells, hold the key to improve chemical processes, as he explains in this video. 
Alexander
Cruz
imec
KU Leuven
VUB

A dog's nose in your smartphone

A dog's nose is one of the most powerful sensors we have. Trained dogs are even able to detect early signs of certain diseases by sniffing our breath. As this would not be very practical, Alex Cruz is looking to integrate a doglike 'nose' in our smartphones to do the trick.
Mihir
Gupta
imec
KU Leuven

Personalized medicine using computer chip technology

"Why is it that there are so many different sizes of clothes?  Simple, because one size cannot fit all. But how come our medical treatments  are not customized and tailored to each patients biological needs?" That's what Mihir Gupta is working on at imec and KU Leuven.
Jacopo
Sala
imec
KU Leuven

Window solar panels

"If we would cover the entire surface of Portugal with solar panels , this would generate enough energy to power the entire world. But of course, no Portuguese would ever allow this. But what about using their windows?" Jacopo Sala talks about new generation of solar panels.
Balakumar
Baskaran
imec
KU Leuven

Zooming-in on the nanoscale

"In the early days, a computer was the size of a storage room. But today, this computer wouldn't stand a chance against the smartphone in your pocket" How is this even possible? Well, thanks to the nanotechnology inside your smartphone. In his PhD Balakumar Baskaran zooms in on the nanoscale
Anastasiia
Kruv
imec
KU Leuven

Skyscrapers in your gadgets

New smartphones and laptops with increased memory capacity are released all the time. We've become used to have more storage available at a lower price continuously. Anastassiia Kruv (imec) explains how scientist and engineers are constantly challenged to assure this trend.
Ingmar
Dasseville
KU Leuven

Your laws? My laws? Our laws!

Computer scientist Ingmar Dasseville (KU Leuven) tries to ensure that our tax money is spent more efficiently. How? By developing computer languages that our government can use, for example, to develop more efficient and thus cheaper tax software.