Videos

Alexandre
Chevalier
KBIN

Knowing the past to predict the future

Alexandre Chevalier studies plants from the past. He is convinced that this knowledge can help us to grow food in a more sustainable way.
Quentin
Goffette
KBIN

Did our ancestors fancy birds for dinner?

Nowadays, 98 million tons of chicken are consumed every year, making it the second most consumed meat in the world, after pork. BUt what about the past?Β Well, Quentin Goffette tries to find out which place birds occupied in the daily life (or menu) of our ancestors.Β 
Wim
Wouters
KBIN

Fish bones: more than a detail in archeology!

"The study of a simple fishbone, provides us with a lot of insights on economic, ecologic and social level." Needless to say Wim Wouters is a fan of fish bones. He investigates fish remains from numerous archeological sites in order to reconstruct the history of fishing.Β 
Gontran
Sonet
KBIN

Why explore the DNA in museum specimens?

Gontran Sonet explains why it is important for the Museum of Natural Sciences to have large collections of specimens. They are paramount to gain better understanding of our fascinating planet.
Tara
Chapman
KBIN

Did Neandertals breakdance?

Were Neandertals able to breakdance? We bet you never thought of that question before, but that you're dying to know the answer by now. Well, Tara Chapman virtually (re)constructs skeletons of Neandertals and fuses them to movement of modern human to find out how they could have moved about.
Lien
Speleers
KBIN

What plant remains tell us about the history of Brussels

Cesspits, you undoubtedly prefer to leave them closed. But that's not the case with 'plant archeologist' Lien Speleers. For her, cesspools offer treasures of information that help her to reconstruct the history of Brussels.
Ine
Hostyn
Arteveldehogeschool

Video coaching offers child care workers a new pair of eyes πŸ‘€

As a teacher or child care worker, wouldn't it be great to be able to press the pause button for once? Not to rest, but to be able to better observe the interactions between all those children in the classroom. Ine Hostyn has found a solution to this problem! Find out how she uses video coaching to give child supervisors a new pair of eyesΒ  πŸ‘€
Liselotte
Vandenbussche
Arteveldehogeschool

Stereotypes about girls and boys πŸ‘¦πŸΌ πŸ‘§πŸ½

Are boys better at maths than girls? No, that is a typically Western idea. In Asia, they think just the opposite. Liselotte Vandenbussche wants to put an end to this kind of stereotype with GenderPro(o)f.
Xenia
Geysemans
Arteveldehogeschool
UAntwerpen

Grieving at work: why is it so deadly quiet?

"We must learn to talk about death, also in the workplace". Xenia Geysemans investigates how employers can better support grieving employees. Currently, employers are often too absent. In this video, Xenia offers 4 concrete tips.
Carolien
Frijns
Arteveldehogeschool
KU Leuven

Equal educational opportunities in and after corona times? πŸ‘¨πŸ½β€πŸ« πŸ‘©πŸ»β€πŸ« 🏫

Organizing education in corona times is quite a challenge for schools. Fortunately, the teacher training colleges and their student teachers come to the rescue via the "Small Children, Big Chances" network. Carolien Frijns (Arteveldehogeschool) explains how they offer help so that all children can receive customized support πŸ’ͺ πŸ‘Š
Kristin
Van Damme
Arteveldehogeschool
UGent

How Spotify becomes a newsreader πŸ“± πŸ‘¨β€πŸ’Ό πŸ“°

How do we bring relevant news to young people, who are often not in the habit of reading a newspaper or scrolling through a news app? Kristin Van Damme researches this for and with young people. What to think of a news alarm clock or could Spotify make a career as a newsreader?
Tom
De Neve
Arteveldehogeschool

Is my smartphone too loud?

Do you often listen to music with headphones or earphones? Then prick up your ears for the research of Tom De Neve (Arteveldehogeschool). He wants to make sure that you can listen to music safely, without damaging your hearing.