Videos

Gwenny
Thomassen
UAntwerpen
UGent
UHasselt

How to reduce the environmental impact of new inventions?

Too often, companies take too little account of the environmental impact of these inventions when developing new products. Gwenny Thomassen wants to change this: she developed a model to calculate both the cost price and the impact on the environment for products based on micro-algae.
Willem
Vercruysse
UHasselt

From biomass to renewable bioproducts

Ever heard of pyrolysis? Then chances are you have a self-cleaning oven. But pyrolysis more than a fancy option in a modern oven. Willem Vercruysse uses this method to make fertilizers and water purification products from microalgae and ivy. 
Tori
Langill
UHasselt

How to grow healthy crops on bad lands

Once upon a time there was a bright and passionate young microbiologist who dreamt of growing healthy crops on bad lands. But how on earth could she grow crops on land devoid of life? ... Are you wondering how this fairy tale continues? Let Tori Langill take you along in her 'magical' research story.
Nora
Reinolsmann
UHasselt

The impact of Variable Message Signs on our driving behaviour

Do you ever feel overloaded with information when you drive by a digital sign displaying traffic information on a highway? Nora Reinolsmann investigates the impact of these displays on our driving behaviour. Do they really help us to better respond to a driving situation ahead?
Jolien
Robijns
UHasselt

Can light therapy prevent burns?

Many cancer patients undergo radiotherapy as a treatment. Unfortunately, due to this treatment they often suffer from painful burns. Jolien Robijns (Hasselt University International) tries to prevent these burns. How? By using laser light.
Leila
Paquay
UHasselt

Industrial hemp's unexpected friends

Leila Paquay turns to funghi and bacteria to grow high-quality industrial hemp - not to be confused with drug type cannabis.
Elien
Derveaux
UHasselt

How lung cancer leaves useful traces in the blood

Every year about 8,000 people in Belgium develop lung cancer. These people may get the same diagnosis, but their bodies react differently. Elien Derveaux (Universiteit Hasselt) examines whether, on the basis of these differences, we can predict which treatment is most suitable for the patient.
Ingrid
Ruskowski
UHasselt

How internet capabilities can help your company

Marketing managers need to be close to what is going on in their market. Luckily they can rely on digital tools to help them, but it's sometimes hard to keep track as new tools pop up every day. That's why, according to Ingrid Ruskowski (Universiteit Hasselt), companies need to invest in internet capabilities. 
Els
Knippenberg
UHasselt

I-ACT: a useful tool for rehabilitation

Rehabilitation centers are not equipped with enough staff to provide individual training to patients during their recovery. Occupational therapists therefore often have to treat two or three patients at the same time. With the I-Act, a technology that acts like a digital personal coach, Els Knippenberg wants to change this by offering personalised remedial therapy to patients.
Dennis
Fransen
UHasselt

Citizens and government: a game without rules?

Did you know that there is no clear, general regulation in Belgium that regulates the relationship between citizen and government? we currently rely on vague, unwritten principles supplemented by specific legislation, what has led to a jumble of rules. That tangle is what Dennis Fransen wants to help unravel. Through his research he wants to contribute to a general administrative law code in Belgium and Flanders.
Gitte
Slingers
UHasselt

Wheezing and rattling. What's the problem?

Did you know that half of the children experience a period of noisy breathing in their first year of life? For a doctor it's not always easy to come to the right diagnosis. Will the research by Gitte Slingers (University of Hasselt) soon provide any relief?
Melissa
Schepers
UHasselt

Cognition enhancers: key in the recovery of MS patients?

When we think of MS patients, we often think of people in a wheelchair. This is because multiple sclerosis affects the motor functions of the patient and patients do often end up in a wheelchair. Together with her UHasselt colleagues, Melissa Schepers is determined to banish that image of MS patients in a wheelchair to the past.