Videos

Joris
Van Houtven
UAntwerpen
UHasselt
VITO

Pathology-predicting proteins

Imagine being sick and simply being able to ask your body what's going on and what it needs to get better. Well, the proteins in our body can tell us that. But it takes a long time for us to understand what they're saying. With his tool, QCquan.net, bioinformatician Joris Van Houtven is determined to speed up that process!
Awadesh
Mallik
FWO
imec
UHasselt

Growing diamonds for cool electronics

Diamonds are not only a girl's best friend (M. Monroe), but they're also an engineer's best friend (A. Mallik). Awadesh Mallik (Universiteit Hasselt - imec) explains why that is and how engineers grow diamonds in the lab. 👨🏽‍🔬 💎
Tim
Bomberna
FWO
UGent

Liver cancer: how do we get the medicines to the tumor?

As if developing a cancer drug is not difficult enough, you still have to successfully get that medicine to the tumor. Tim Bomberna (Ghent University) explains how computer simulations show us the way.
Pieter
Verding
FWO
UHasselt

No dirty glasses anymore!

Pieter Verding wants to make your life easier. His goal: to make sure you no longer have to clean your windows or glasses. How? Well, by developing self-cleaning coatings 👇 🎥
Jonathan
Op de Beeck
FWO
imec
KU Leuven

How to see the invisible?

Have you ever tried to look at something, but it was too small to see? Well, scientists improving your smartphone are facing this issue on a daily basis. Jonathan Op de Beeck (imec - KU Leuven) explains how they are able to 'see' the invisible.
Bryan
Convens
FWO
VUB

Smart drones safely swarming in the sky

Imagine you buy something online and the next day a delivery drone delivers your package at your front door. Robotics engineer Bryan Convens is developing computer algorithms to make this happen. He wants to ensure that swarms of drones can fly autonomously ánd safely through the sky.
Pieter
Libin
FWO
VUB

Keeping epidemics under control thanks to artificial intelligence

The current corona crisis is having a huge impact on our lives. Artificial intelligence can help keep such a pandemic better under control, with less drastic measures and thus a more limited impact on our social lives. Pieter Libin explains how this works in this video.
Klaas
Vander Linden
FWO
KU Leuven

Plumbing in the body: a heartbreaking choice

An aortic aneurysm is a bulging of the large body artery. If such an aneurysm bursts, the patient can die. You'd think you'd better have surgery for this immediately, but such an operation is complex and risky. That is why engineer Klaas Vander Linden (KU Leuven)is trying to predict whether an aneurysm will burst.
Max
Bols
FWO
KU Leuven

Beating enzymes at chemical catalysis

To make the production of plastics and other chemical processes less energy-intensive and waste-producing, Max Bols turns to nature. Enzymes, the catalysts of living cells, hold the key to improve chemical processes, as he explains in this video. 
Robin
Bonné
FWO
UHasselt

Can you build a smartphone from bacteria?

Last year, scientists discovered bacteria in the mud of the North Sea that can conduct electricity. Robin Bonné (Hasselt University - FWO) is investigating whether we can use these 'cable bacteria' to create biodegradable electronic wires.