Videos

Gwenny
Thomassen
UAntwerpen
UGent
UHasselt
VITO

How to reduce the environmental impact of new inventions?

Too often, companies take too little account of the environmental impact of these inventions when developing new products. Gwenny Thomassen wants to change this: she developed a model to calculate both the cost price and the impact on the environment for products based on micro-algae.
Nicolas
De Neuter
FWO
UAntwerpen

Your immune system hacked

Why do some people get sick more easily than others? This is often due to differences in our immune systems. Nicolas De Neuter (UAntwerp) hopes to understand these differences, in order to develop better and more efficient personalized immune therapies.
Lore
Wyers
KU Leuven
UAntwerpen

Why do some children have difficulties walking?

Ever heard of Dravet's syndrome? This rare condition occurs in 1 in 20,000 people and causes problems with walking, among other things. Lore Wyers (UAntwerpen - KU Leuven) is going the extra mile to help children with Dravet syndrome to walk better again. The first 'step': analysing their step pattern.
Niels
Van Putte
FWO
UAntwerpen

Tidal marshes unravelled

Ever heard of tidal marshes? These are areas that are regularly inundated by the tide. They protect us from floods and ensure better water quality in our rivers. How does that work? Niels van Putte (UAntwerpen) tells you all about in this pitch! (Warning: this video is 'flooded' with faint puns).
Yixing
Sui
UAntwerpen

Microalgae, a future sustainable food source?

Yixing Sui is a kind of farmer. The 'crop' he is growing? Microalgae! These tiny living organisms might prove to be an important solution for the increasing food demands due to large population growth.
Senne
Van Loon
UAntwerpen

In search of the very coldest

Did you know that the coldest temperatures in the universe are measured on our earth? At the University of Antwerp, Senne Van Loon explores the very coldest: by investigating ultra-cold gases, he helps to broaden our knowledge of quantum physics.
Annelies
Augustyns
FWO
UAntwerpen
VUB

What diaries teach us about everyday life in the Third Reich

"The cemetery was the place where Jewish life was concentrated at the end. It was the place where people went to sunbathe, children had to play, ..." Literature scholar Annelies Augustyns (VUB - UAntwerp - FWO) studied German-Jewish diaries from WWII for her PhD. These offer a glimpse into the "everyday" life of Jews in the Third Reich.
Michaël
Bauwens
UAntwerpen

Why do the social sciences fail?

Hard sciences, such as physics, understand very well how the material world works and have contributed to enormous technological progress. But the social sciences, such as economics or sociology, do not seem to understand as well how the social world - human society - works. Thus, we apparently do not know how to build a peaceful and prosperous society worldwide. Michael Bauwens (UAntwerpen) tries to find out which fundamental assumptions researchers should use to do social science.
Leen
Van den Steen
FWO
UAntwerpen

Swallowing rehabilitation in head and neck cancer patients

Radiation can save the lives of people with head and neck cancer. Unfortunately, many patients develop swallowing disorders as a result of the treatment, which makes it impossible for them to eat solid food. Leen Van den Steen (UAntwerpen - UZA) wants to help them. How? With tongue strength training.
Sébastjen
Schoenaers
FWO
UAntwerpen

How plants really grow

Biologist Sébastjen Schoenaers (UAntwerpen) watches his son Ferre grow rapidly. Yet Ferre grows 150 times slower than an ordinary corn leaf 🌱 We still don't understand how plants do this. Sébastjen zooms in on the plant up to molecular level to figure out how it really grows 🔬 This can help us grow plants better and faster.
Isabel
Witvrouwen
FWO
UAntwerpen

Treating heart failure with sport: looking for the secret ingredient 🏃🏻‍♀️

Heart failure patients have a lot of trouble with physical exertion. They can barely even walk the dog. To improve their condition, they can follow training programs in the hospital. But more than half of the patients hardly benefit from them. Cardiologist in training Isabel Witvrouwen (UAntwerpen - University Hospital Antwerp) is trying to find out why.
Dorien
Verdoodt
UAntwerpen

An injection to solve hearing loss?

In Belgium and the Netherlands, more than 1,000 people suffer from DFNA9, a condition that causes hereditary hearing loss and balance disorders. DFNA9 is due to an error in the DNA of the ear. Dorien Verdoodt (UAntwerp) is conducting research into a new therapy based on the revolutionary Crispr genetic technique. In this way, she hopes to be able to cure hereditary hearing loss in the future with a syringe in the ear.