Videos

Maxine
Crauwels
VUB

When good guys become bad

During cancer treatments medicines sometimes tend to remain in the kidneys of patients, which can be a problem because they can cause damage to healthy cells there. Maxine Crauwels is carrying out research to help guide the medication to the exit.  
Jessica
Bridoux
VUB

Tumours, masters in disguise

Jessica Bridoux, researcher at the University of Brussels (VUB), is developing a diagnostic tool to track tumourcells that are trying to hide from our immune system.
Jan-Pieter
Ploem
UHasselt

Flatworms help track down carcinogens!

Every year, many mice are sacrificed for science. These animals are used, among other things, to test whether certain substances are carcinogenic. Jan-Pieter Ploem is working on a new test method that uses flatworms, that will hopefully help save a lot of mice.
Yana
Dekempeneer
VUB

Cancer-free thanks to the camel?

Yana Dekempeneer is looking for a new, more effective method of treating breast cancer and she's putting her hope on camels... 
Nena
Testelmans
KU Leuven
VIB

Organ transplants: life-saving, yet sometimes lethal

While an organ transplant will often save the life of a patient, it also leads to a higher risk of developing cancer. Nena Testelmans (KU Leuven) is determined to help unravel why transplants might induce cancer in patients.
Celine
Everaert
UGent

Using computing power to fight cancer

Did you know that cancer researchers draw inspiration from applications such as Amazon, Facebook and even Tinder? Armed with a supercomputer, Celine Everaert, like these applications, processes large amounts of data. Not to sell books or to help people get on a date, but to offer cancer patients personalised treatments.
Elien
De Thaye
UGent

Monitoring cancer in the blood

Waiting for results after a medical examination often causes stress and uncertainty, especially in cancer patients. That is why Elien De Thaye is working on a method to determine the effect of a chemo treatment on people with peritoneal cancer more quickly on the basis of a so-called marker in the blood.
Kristel
Paque
UGent
VUB

Are all those pills really needed as the end approaches?

Up to 91 pills a week. That's how many medicines people take at the end of their lives. Kristel Paque is investigating whether all these pills are really necessary.
Ruben
Van Paemel
UGent

Liquid biopsies in cancer diagnosis

Did you know that 1 in 100 people who develop cancer are under 18 years of age? In order to diagnose cancer, a surgical biopsy is often required. But Ruben Van Paemel and his colleagues want to change this. They want to detect cancer in children by taking a simple blood sample.
Ovia Margaret
Thirukkumaran
KU Leuven

HER2 breast cancer: comprehend to conquer it!

Did you know that breast cancer is the second most common cancer for women, affecting 1.7 million women worldwide? In her research Ovia Margaret Thirukkumaran is trying to decipher how cancer cells communicate and develop resistance against drugs in so called HER 2 breast cancer, a very aggressive form of breast cancer.
Elien
Derveaux
UHasselt

How lung cancer leaves useful traces in the blood

Every year about 8,000 people in Belgium develop lung cancer. These people may get the same diagnosis, but their bodies react differently. Elien Derveaux (Universiteit Hasselt) examines whether, on the basis of these differences, we can predict which treatment is most suitable for the patient.
Jolien
Robijns
UHasselt

Can light therapy prevent burns?

Many cancer patients undergo radiotherapy as a treatment. Unfortunately, due to this treatment they often suffer from painful burns. Jolien Robijns (Hasselt University International) tries to prevent these burns. How? By using laser light.