Videos

Ben
Somers
FWO
KU Leuven

How can we make hearing implants smarter?

A cochlear implant makes it possible for the deaf and hearing impaired to hear well. This is a wonderful invention, but it requires some work to properly set up and keep the device up to date. But Ben Somers has a solution for that!
Nicolas
De Neuter
FWO
UAntwerpen

Your immune system hacked

Why do some people get sick more easily than others? This is often due to differences in our immune systems. Nicolas De Neuter (UAntwerp) hopes to understand these differences, in order to develop better and more efficient personalized immune therapies.
Bjorn
Criel
FWO
UGent

The next generation of antibiotics: as simple as Lego?

According to the World Health Organization, antibiotic-resistant superbacteria will kill 10 million people worldwide every year by 2050. Bjorn Criel and his colleagues at Ghent University want to put a stop to this. They're counting on special allies: bacteriophages.
Ruben
Van Paemel
FWO
UGent

Liquid biopsies in cancer diagnosis

Did you know that 1 in 100 people who develop cancer are under 18 years of age? In order to diagnose cancer, a surgical biopsy is often required. But Ruben Van Paemel and his colleagues want to change this. They want to detect cancer in children by taking a simple blood sample.
Celine
Everaert
FWO
UGent

Using computing power to fight cancer

Did you know that cancer researchers draw inspiration from applications such as Amazon, Facebook and even Tinder? Armed with a supercomputer, Celine Everaert, like these applications, processes large amounts of data. Not to sell books or to help people get on a date, but to offer cancer patients personalised treatments.
Alexander
Cambré
FWO
KU Leuven

Killing bad bugs!

From sour wine, to Egyptians and Romans, to the wonderful discovery of Louis Pasteur some 150 years ago: Alexander Cambré tells you about bad bacteria and how they make us sick. In his research he tries to understand more about the Salmonella bacteria so that we can combat them better.
Melissa
Schepers
FWO
UHasselt

Cognition enhancers: key in the recovery of MS patients?

When we think of MS patients, we often think of people in a wheelchair. This is because multiple sclerosis affects the motor functions of the patient and patients do often end up in a wheelchair. Together with her UHasselt colleagues, Melissa Schepers is determined to banish that image of MS patients in a wheelchair to the past.
Hannelore
Bové
FWO
KU Leuven
UHasselt

Soot: the invisible culprit

Hannelore Bové developed a new technique that allows for the first time to detect and count the number of soot particles a person has in his or her body. This is an important step in order to determine the precise impact of soot on our health.
Ben
Rombaut
FWO
UHasselt

In search of the cause of Alzheimer's

In patients with Alzheimer's, microglia, the immune cells that protect our brains, suddenly start damaging the brain themselves by eating synapses. Ben Rombaut is trying to find out why this happens. In this way, he wants to help ensure that in our old age we can all stay on our toes.
Tim
Bomberna
FWO
UGent

Liver cancer: how do we get the medicines to the tumor?

As if developing a cancer drug is not difficult enough, you still have to successfully get that medicine to the tumor. Tim Bomberna (Ghent University) explains how computer simulations show us the way.
Sam
Vanherle
FWO
UHasselt

Is the key to MS therapy hidden in your body?

Immune cells serve to protect us. In multiple sclerosis, however, some immune cells just turn against the body and damage the nervous system. Sam Vanherle (Hasselt University) wants to detect these 'bad guys' in patients' blood and get them back on the right track. 💉
Assia
Tiane
FWO
UHasselt

Progressive MS: looking for the switch in our DNA in ons DNA

Did you know that there are already more than 15 medications for multiple sclerosis? Yet the more than 1 million progressive MS patients do not benefit from them, because these drugs only work in the early stages of the disease. Assia Tiane wants to help unravel the disease in order to improve the quality of life of progressive MS patients.