Videos

Elien
De Thaye
UGent

Monitoring cancer in the blood

Waiting for results after a medical examination often causes stress and uncertainty, especially in cancer patients. That is why Elien De Thaye is working on a method to determine the effect of a chemo treatment on people with peritoneal cancer more quickly on the basis of a so-called marker in the blood.
Kristel
Paque
UGent
VUB

Are all those pills really needed as the end approaches?

Up to 91 pills a week. That's how many medicines people take at the end of their lives. Kristel Paque is investigating whether all these pills are really necessary.
Ruben
Van Paemel
FWO
UGent

Liquid biopsies in cancer diagnosis

Did you know that 1 in 100 people who develop cancer are under 18 years of age? In order to diagnose cancer, a surgical biopsy is often required. But Ruben Van Paemel and his colleagues want to change this. They want to detect cancer in children by taking a simple blood sample.
Celine
Everaert
FWO
UGent

Using computing power to fight cancer

Did you know that cancer researchers draw inspiration from applications such as Amazon, Facebook and even Tinder? Armed with a supercomputer, Celine Everaert, like these applications, processes large amounts of data. Not to sell books or to help people get on a date, but to offer cancer patients personalised treatments.
Nena
Testelmans
KU Leuven
VIB

Organ transplants: life-saving, yet sometimes lethal

While an organ transplant will often save the life of a patient, it also leads to a higher risk of developing cancer. Nena Testelmans (KU Leuven) is determined to help unravel why transplants might induce cancer in patients.
Tim
Bomberna
FWO
UGent

Liver cancer: how do we get the medicines to the tumor?

As if developing a cancer drug is not difficult enough, you still have to successfully get that medicine to the tumor. Tim Bomberna (Ghent University) explains how computer simulations show us the way.
Mónica
Vara Perez
FWO
KU Leuven
VIB

Understanding the self-cannibalism instincts of melanoma

Melanoma is a very common and lethal type of skin cancer. Melanoma cells have a strange, yet effective defence mechanism called autophagy: they can manage to survive by eating parts of themselves. Monica Vara Perez tries to figure out this self-cannibalism mechanism in order to help defeat melanoma.
Marlies
Vanden Bempt
KU Leuven
VIB

Immunotherapy: why screening patients is key

Immunotherapy is increasingly being used in the fight against cancer. But this therapy does not work for all patients. You would think that if it doesn't work, it doesn't it hurt. Unfortunately, it does! Marlies Vanden Bempt (VIB - KU Leuven) explains why.
Matteo
Rossi
FWO
KU Leuven
VIB

Finding the weak spot of breast cancer cells

Despite recent advances in breast cancer treatment, too many women still die once this cancer has spread throughout their body. That's why Matteo Rossi is looking to find weaknesses of breast cancer cells, in order to defeat them.