Videos

Elien
De Thaye
UGent

Monitoring cancer in the blood

Waiting for results after a medical examination often causes stress and uncertainty, especially in cancer patients. That is why Elien De Thaye is working on a method to determine the effect of a chemo treatment on people with peritoneal cancer more quickly on the basis of a so-called marker in the blood.
Kristel
Paque
UGent
VUB

Are all those pills really needed as the end approaches?

Up to 91 pills a week. That's how many medicines people take at the end of their lives. Kristel Paque is investigating whether all these pills are really necessary.
Ruben
Van Paemel
FWO
UGent

Liquid biopsies in cancer diagnosis

Did you know that 1 in 100 people who develop cancer are under 18 years of age? In order to diagnose cancer, a surgical biopsy is often required. But Ruben Van Paemel and his colleagues want to change this. They want to detect cancer in children by taking a simple blood sample.
Celine
Everaert
FWO
UGent

Using computing power to fight cancer

Did you know that cancer researchers draw inspiration from applications such as Amazon, Facebook and even Tinder? Armed with a supercomputer, Celine Everaert, like these applications, processes large amounts of data. Not to sell books or to help people get on a date, but to offer cancer patients personalised treatments.
Elise
Pattyn
Arteveldehogeschool

Returning to work after a long-term illness 🎗 🏥 💼

In Belgium, every year more than 25,000 people return to work after cancer treatment. Yet there are many employers who do not know how to react in such a situation. Elise Pattyn (Arteveldehogeschool) and her colleagues are working on tools to make the return to work smoother.
Tim
Bomberna
FWO
UGent

Liver cancer: how do we get the medicines to the tumor?

As if developing a cancer drug is not difficult enough, you still have to successfully get that medicine to the tumor. Tim Bomberna (Ghent University) explains how computer simulations show us the way.