Videos

Jan-Pieter
Ploem
UHasselt

Flatworms help track down carcinogens!

Every year, many mice are sacrificed for science. These animals are used, among other things, to test whether certain substances are carcinogenic. Jan-Pieter Ploem is working on a new test method that uses flatworms, that will hopefully help save a lot of mice.
Dean
Paes
UHasselt

Alzheimer's disease: forget about it?

What is the link between a bucket of water and Alzheimer's disease? Dean Paes (Hasselt University & Maastricht University) will tell you all about it, as well as explain why he is looking for a molecular cork.
Joke
Spildooren
UHasselt

Loose pebbles in the organ of balance will make you dizzy

What if your balance organ suddenly registers movements that aren't there? Well, you'll become dizzy, something that the elderly in particular sometimes have to contend with. This dizziness is often seen as an inevitable aging disorder. But this specific type of vertigo cán be treated, as explained by Joke Spildooren.
Danny
Vanpoucke
FWO
UHasselt

Virtual experiments with real materials

Imagine a world in which you can see and manipulate atoms of your own choice and in which you can rig the forces of nature to your liking. Danny Vanpoucke introduces you to the wonderful world of computational material research.
Frone
Vandewiele
KU Leuven
VIB

The heart to the right rhythm

Frone Vandewiele investigates why not every heart beats to the right rhythm. In her research she wants to further help unravel the complex mechanism behind cardiac arrhythmias in order to help save lives.
Steven
Puttemans
KU Leuven

How to teach smart computers to see and understand their surroundings

Steven Puttemans (KU Leuven) trains smart computers so that they learn to see and understand their surroundings. He for example worked on a strawberry picking robot. He explains how this works in this video.
Rosalie
Coolkens
KU Leuven

How to get your school moving

Children should exercise about 60 minutes a day, but figures show that children in Belgium do not meet that standard. Rosalie Coolkens wants to use schools to help children reach that recommended hour of exercise.
Hannelore
Bové
FWO
KU Leuven
UHasselt

Soot: the invisible culprit

Hannelore Bové developed a new technique that allows for the first time to detect and count the number of soot particles a person has in his or her body. This is an important step in order to determine the precise impact of soot on our health.
Astrid
Blondeel
FWO
KU Leuven

Help, I am short of breath! 🥵

Out of breath after just eight steps up the stairs? That is the case every day for the 600,000 people in Belgium with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Physiotherapist Astrid Blondeel (KU Leuven) wants to help them using a personalised coaching programme and a smartphone app.
Sofie
Claerhout
KU Leuven

DNA as the last resort to find the perpetrator

Sofie Claerhout's doctorate was looking for a new way to trace offenders in a murder case on the basis of DNA found at the crime scene. Using DNA kinship analysis, she can map out distant kinships, up to 40 generations apart, on the basis of a DNA sample. This makes it possible to trace the perpetrator much more precisely.
Shauni
Van Herck
KU Leuven

Combating dyslexia with audio books

Hearing impairments play an important role in dyslexia. For example, people with dyslexia are less able to hear the subtle sound difference at the start of similar letters, such as the 'b' and the 'p'. By offering children adapted audio stories in nursery school, Shauni Van Herck wants to tackle these hearing problems at an early stage.
Joran
Verspreet
VITO

Micro-algae: how to make space food your daily snack?

Micro-algae form a healthy protein-rich meal. No wonder this is eaten by astronauts during space travels 👨‍🚀 Joran Verspreet's (VITO) mission is to get this fancy space food onto your plate 🍽