Videos

Gwenny
Thomassen
UAntwerpen
UGent
UHasselt
VITO

How to reduce the environmental impact of new inventions?

Too often, companies take too little account of the environmental impact of these inventions when developing new products. Gwenny Thomassen wants to change this: she developed a model to calculate both the cost price and the impact on the environment for products based on micro-algae.
Nicolas
De Neuter
FWO
UAntwerpen

Your immune system hacked

Why do some people get sick more easily than others? This is often due to differences in our immune systems. Nicolas De Neuter (UAntwerp) hopes to understand these differences, in order to develop better and more efficient personalized immune therapies.
Lore
Wyers
KU Leuven
UAntwerpen

Why do some children have difficulties walking?

Ever heard of Dravet's syndrome? This rare condition occurs in 1 in 20,000 people and causes problems with walking, among other things. Lore Wyers (UAntwerpen - KU Leuven) is going the extra mile to help children with Dravet syndrome to walk better again. The first 'step': analysing their step pattern.
Niels
Van Putte
FWO
UAntwerpen

Tidal marshes unravelled

Ever heard of tidal marshes? These are areas that are regularly inundated by the tide. They protect us from floods and ensure better water quality in our rivers. How does that work? Niels van Putte (UAntwerpen) tells you all about in this pitch! (Warning: this video is 'flooded' with faint puns).
Yixing
Sui
UAntwerpen

Microalgae, a future sustainable food source?

Yixing Sui is a kind of farmer. The 'crop' he is growing? Microalgae! These tiny living organisms might prove to be an important solution for the increasing food demands due to large population growth.
Senne
Van Loon
UAntwerpen

In search of the very coldest

Did you know that the coldest temperatures in the universe are measured on our earth? At the University of Antwerp, Senne Van Loon explores the very coldest: by investigating ultra-cold gases, he helps to broaden our knowledge of quantum physics.
Antoine
Persyn
FWO
UGent
VIB

The four seasons: a challenge for our farmers

Winter, with its cold temperatures, is not the favourite season of our farmers. Certain plants and crops suffer greatly from the cold. But did you know that these plants themselves have the key to withstand the cold? Antoine Persyn explains exactly how this works.
Frone
Vandewiele
KU Leuven
VIB

The heart to the right rhythm

Frone Vandewiele investigates why not every heart beats to the right rhythm. In her research she wants to further help unravel the complex mechanism behind cardiac arrhythmias in order to help save lives.
Emilie
Cardon
UAntwerpen

Why we should look for tinnitus in the brain

Imagine constantly hearing a ringing bell, a jackhammer, or that awful beep of the old television test screen in your head. That's what people with tinnitus experience. At the UZA they want to treat people with tinnitus better. For too long the cause was sought in the ear, without looking at the crucial motor that controls all our perceptions: the brain. Emilie Cardon (UAntwerpen) explains why we have to look for tinnitus there.
Lauranne
Scheldeman
FWO
KU Leuven
VIB

A stroke in the picture

During a stroke, every second counts to save as many brain cells as possible. Intervention is only possible within a narrow time window of a few hours because late treatment can lead to serious complications. Is there nothing more we can do for these 'late' patients? There is, says neurologist trainee Lauranne Scheldeman!
Katrien
Van Dyck
FWO
KU Leuven
VIB

A conspiracy between two microbes

Together you are always stronger. Unfortunately, this also applies to some microbes, which can conspire to make us seriously ill. Microbiologist Katrien Van Dyck is investigating such a conspiracy between a fungus and a microbe that work together to cause a serious infection. By studying the interaction between the two, she hopes to find out how we can break their alliance.
Hanne
Massonet
KU Leuven
UAntwerpen

Chronic swallowing problems after head and neck cancer

Thanks to new radiotherapy techniques, more and more patients with head and neck cancer are surviving. But for 70% of them, this radiation causes chronic swallowing problems, making it difficult to eat and drink. Hanne Massonet hopes to help them enjoy food and drink again by training their tongue, mouth, and throat muscles.