Looking inside tissue without cutting

What do bone marrow, liver and a tumor have in common? They all consist of so-called "soft tissue", which is not easily visualized by a CT scan. In order to study it, therefore, one has to extract pieces from a patient's body. Sarah Vangrunderbeeck wants to help change this.
Health
Technology
Sarah Vangrunderbeeck
KU Leuven

About us

Science Figured Out lures scientists out of their trusted lab or office space and places them in front of a camera with a clear task: inform the general public in a clear 3-minute pitch about your research!

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Karolien
Adriaens
KU Leuven

Does the electronic cigarette help to quit smoking?

Quitting smoking is quite a challenge. In her PhD, Karolien Adriaens (KU Leuven) shows that the e-cigarette is an effective tool to help smokers eventually get rid of their addiction.
Michelle
Melis
KU Leuven

Chemo also affects the brain

Chemotherapy affects the brains of patients. It can lead to cognitive complaints, stress, and fatigue. Michelle Melis achieves promising results with mindfulness in patients with breast cancer. 
Sebastiaan
Vanuytven
FWO
KU Leuven

Analysis of tumours, cell by cell

What is the link between a smoothie and the analysis of cancer tumours? Well, Sebastiaan Vanuytven explains it smooth(l)y in this video
Sara
Petit-Jean
KU Leuven

White bread, but deliciously rich in fibre

Do you also love bread? Belgians eat an average of 33 kg of bread a year, about 1,000 slices. But that's mostly white bread, which doesn't contain much fibre. To make us eat more of that healthy fibre, Sara Petit-Jean (KU Leuven) is working on new, high-fibre white bread.
Julie
Metta
KU Leuven

Mapping the maker movement

Have you ever broken one of your cherished devices, but had to dump it because you couldn't fix it? Julie Metta (KU Leuven) wants to help us reclaim our belongings, by uncovering local heroes, called the Makers.
Alexander
Cruz
imec
KU Leuven
VUB

A dog's nose in your smartphone

A dog's nose is one of the most powerful sensors we have. Trained dogs are even able to detect early signs of certain diseases by sniffing our breath. As this would not be very practical, Alex Cruz is looking to integrate a doglike 'nose' in our smartphones to do the trick.

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