Videos

Annelii
Ny
KU Leuven

Didy, the epileptic zebrafish

Did you know that 80 million people worldwide have epilepsy? Thanks to genetically engineered zebrafish such as Didy, Annelii Ny (KU Leuven) hopes to find new drugs to treat these patients.
Ben
Somers
FWO
KU Leuven

How can we make hearing implants smarter?

A cochlear implant makes it possible for the deaf and hearing impaired to hear well. This is a wonderful invention, but it requires some work to properly set up and keep the device up to date. But Ben Somers has a solution for that!
Lore
Wyers
KU Leuven
UAntwerpen

Why do some children have difficulties walking?

Ever heard of Dravet's syndrome? This rare condition occurs in 1 in 20,000 people and causes problems with walking, among other things. Lore Wyers (UAntwerpen - KU Leuven) is going the extra mile to help children with Dravet syndrome to walk better again. The first 'step': analysing their step pattern.
Subha
Lakshmi Sharma
KU Leuven

Killing viruses by looking away from it

While medicine has come a long way to help HIV-patients, current drugs can't rid these patients of their HIV-infection. The drugs do not cure the infection, but suppress the virus to such an extent that no symptoms of the disease occur. Subha Lakshmi Sharma wants to contribute to finding a complete cure for the virus. Something she hopes to achieve by not looking at the virus itself, but by looking away from it.
Alexander
Cambré
FWO
KU Leuven

Killing bad bugs!

From sour wine, to Egyptians and Romans, to the wonderful discovery of Louis Pasteur some 150 years ago: Alexander Cambré tells you about bad bacteria and how they make us sick. In his research he tries to understand more about the Salmonella bacteria so that we can combat them better.
Dieudonné
Buh Kum
KU Leuven

The design of safe, cheap and potent vaccines

Many vaccines need to be stored in refrigerators, which can be challenging in warmer and low income countries. That's why Dieudonné Buh Kum and his colleagues at KU Leuven are developing new, cheaper & more stable vaccines that will help save more lives.
Frone
Vandewiele
KU Leuven
VIB

The heart to the right rhythm

Frone Vandewiele investigates why not every heart beats to the right rhythm. In her research she wants to further help unravel the complex mechanism behind cardiac arrhythmias in order to help save lives.
Rosalie
Coolkens
KU Leuven

How to get your school moving

Children should exercise about 60 minutes a day, but figures show that children in Belgium do not meet that standard. Rosalie Coolkens wants to use schools to help children reach that recommended hour of exercise.
Katrien
Van Dyck
FWO
KU Leuven
VIB

A conspiracy between two microbes

Together you are always stronger. Unfortunately, this also applies to some microbes, which can conspire to make us seriously ill. Microbiologist Katrien Van Dyck is investigating such a conspiracy between a fungus and a microbe that work together to cause a serious infection. By studying the interaction between the two, she hopes to find out how we can break their alliance.
Hanne
Massonet
KU Leuven
UAntwerpen

Chronic swallowing problems after head and neck cancer

Thanks to new radiotherapy techniques, more and more patients with head and neck cancer are surviving. But for 70% of them, this radiation causes chronic swallowing problems, making it difficult to eat and drink. Hanne Massonet hopes to help them enjoy food and drink again by training their tongue, mouth, and throat muscles.
Nicky
Daniels
KU Leuven

Oxytocin: more than just the cuddle hormone

Do you ever stress about presentations? Imagine if you felt that stress all the time. Well, that is the case with some individuals, such as children with autism. They find social interactions to be frightening and sometimes even threatening. Can a nasal spray with oxytocin relieve them of that stress? That is what Nicky Daniels is investigating at KU Leuven.
Marthe
Everaert
KU Leuven

How to solve swallowing problems?

After a stroke, many people suffer from swallowing problems (dysphagia), due to damage to brain areas responsible for controlling and coordinating the swallowing process. Can electrical stimulation help them restore the brain control of swallowing, to eat and drink comfortably again? That's what Marthe Everaert is looking into in her PhD.