Videos

Pieter
Vanpaemel
KU Leuven
Vlerick

The social influence of digitale interfaces

Do Google Home, Alexa and Siri have a social impact on our behaviour? Can they encourage us to drive more safely or convince us to exercise more often? That is what Pieter Vanpaemel (Vlerick Business School - KU Leuven) researches in his doctorate.
Nicholas
Vijverman
UGent
Vlerick

Circular economy: how to produce sustainably?

"If we think in circles, we start producing and consuming differently. In his research, Nicholas Vijverman (Vlerick Business School - University of Ghent) studies how we can engage everyone - from government, producer to consumer - in the circular economy. ♻️
Milica
Velimirovic
FWO
UGent
VITO

Nanoparticles in your sunscreen

When you enjoy a day on the beach, you want to make sure to wear sunscreen to avoid sunburn. But did you know that quite a few sunscreens contain nanoparticles to help protect your skin from the sun? The use of nanoparticles is strictly regulated and only a limited amount can be used. Milica Velimirovic (VITO) is developing a new & fast analysis method to measure nanoparticles and their quantity in sunscreen. 
Awadesh
Mallik
FWO
imec
UHasselt

Growing diamonds for cool electronics

Diamonds are not only a girl's best friend (M. Monroe), but they're also an engineer's best friend (A. Mallik). Awadesh Mallik (Universiteit Hasselt - imec) explains why that is and how engineers grow diamonds in the lab. 👨🏽‍🔬 💎
Tim
Bomberna
FWO
UGent

Liver cancer: how do we get the medicines to the tumor?

As if developing a cancer drug is not difficult enough, you still have to successfully get that medicine to the tumor. Tim Bomberna (Ghent University) explains how computer simulations show us the way.
Pieter
Verding
FWO
UHasselt

No dirty glasses anymore!

Pieter Verding wants to make your life easier. His goal: to make sure you no longer have to clean your windows or glasses. How? Well, by developing self-cleaning coatings 👇 🎥
Jonathan
Op de Beeck
FWO
imec
KU Leuven

How to see the invisible?

Have you ever tried to look at something, but it was too small to see? Well, scientists improving your smartphone are facing this issue on a daily basis. Jonathan Op de Beeck (imec - KU Leuven) explains how they are able to 'see' the invisible.
Shirley
Elprama
imec
VUB

Will an exoskeleton give me superpower?

Industrial exoskeletons can support factory and construction workers in their heavy daily tasks and prevent back pain and other work-related injuries. So why exoskeletons not yet widely used in companies? That's what Shirley Elprama (Imec - VUB) is researching: she talks to companies and informs exoskeleton-designers so that they can build better exoskeletons in the future. 
Negin
Madelat
VUB

Water, oxygen and metals: a perfect recipe for disaster

Corrosion of metal structures can lead to disasters, such as the collapse of the Morandi bridge in Genua in 2018. In order to help prevent such tragedies engineer Negin Madelat is working on a method for the early detection of corrosion underneath a thick layer of coating.
Bryan
Convens
FWO
VUB

Smart drones safely swarming in the sky

Imagine you buy something online and the next day a delivery drone delivers your package at your front door. Robotics engineer Bryan Convens is developing computer algorithms to make this happen. He wants to ensure that swarms of drones can fly autonomously ánd safely through the sky.
Pieter
Libin
FWO
VUB

Keeping epidemics under control thanks to artificial intelligence

The current corona crisis is having a huge impact on our lives. Artificial intelligence can help keep such a pandemic better under control, with less drastic measures and thus a more limited impact on our social lives. Pieter Libin explains how this works in this video.
Klaas
Vander Linden
FWO
KU Leuven

Plumbing in the body: a heartbreaking choice

An aortic aneurysm is a bulging of the large body artery. If such an aneurysm bursts, the patient can die. You'd think you'd better have surgery for this immediately, but such an operation is complex and risky. That is why engineer Klaas Vander Linden (KU Leuven)is trying to predict whether an aneurysm will burst.