Videos

Koen
Wouters
UHasselt

Can bacteria reduce electronic waste?

In 2012, scientists found interesting bacteria in the mud of the North Sea. Further investigation showed that these bacteria conduct electricity, just like power cables. But how exactly do these bacteria do this? And does this offer potential for more clean electronics? This is what Koen Wouters (UHasselt) and his colleagues are investigating.
Stijn
Dilissen
UHasselt

How microscopy unravels the secrets of drugs and their targets

Of the 100 potential drugs that companies develop, only a small fraction make it to your medicine cabinet. The majority are rejected after disappointing cell and animal tests. Stijn Dilissen (Uhasselt) is working on a method to find out more quickly and cheaply whether a drug will work or not.
Lize
Evens
UHasselt

Using stem cells to cure a heart attack

In a heart attack, certain heart cells are damaged and they will never recover. So a patient is forever left with a scar on his heart, which will reduce the heart's pumping power. Could stem cells be the solution? Lize Evens (Hasselt University) explains it to you in this video.
Philippos
Koulousakis
UHasselt

Oxytocin against dementia

What if you could help someone with dementia by giving them a big, old hug? Might sound crazy, but neuroscientist Philippos Koulousakis (UHasselt) explains why he looks at oxytocin, aka 'the hugging hormone', to boost the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease.
Sibren
Haesen
UHasselt

Cancer today, heart damage tomorrow?

Cancer patients often become heart patients. This is because chemotherapy affects not only cancer cells but also healthy cells, such as the heart muscle cells. In order to prevent heart damage after chemotherapy, we first need to know what factors increase the risk of heart damage. And that is what Sibren Haesen (Uhasselt) has made his mission. With his Ph.D., he wants to help ensure that today's cancer patients do not become tomorrow's heart patients.
Eva
Bongaerts
UHasselt

How harmful is air pollution to your unborn child?

An unborn child is exposed to air pollution even before he or she breathes for the first time. This is shown by the research of Eva Bongaerts (UHasselt). She found soot particles in the placenta of women who were only 12 weeks into their pregnancy. Watch the video.
Bram
Bamps
UHasselt

Better food thanks to better sealing

Did you ever enjoy a nicely packed fruit salad with an easy-peel lid? It's a beautiful display of packaging technology: the packaging is strong enough to protect your food, yet at the same time very easy for you to open once you want to dive in. Bram Bamps (UHasselt) explains how he optimizes heat-sealing packaging to keep our food safe and to ensure long shelf life.
Karen
Libberecht
FWO
UHasselt
VIB

Studying a patient in a Petri dish

Imagine not being able to feel a hug anymore. This is what happens to some patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1A). They get weaker muscles, their muscles die and sometimes they even lose the sense of touch. In order to research the disease more quickly and efficiently, Karen Libberecht (UHasselt - VIB - FWO) studies her patients ... in a petri dish. She explains how that works exactly in this video.
Joris
Van Houtven
UAntwerpen
UHasselt
VITO

Pathology-predicting proteins

Imagine being sick and simply being able to ask your body what's going on and what it needs to get better. Well, the proteins in our body can tell us that. But it takes a long time for us to understand what they're saying. With his tool, QCquan.net, bioinformatician Joris Van Houtven is determined to speed up that process!
Rossella
Alfano
UHasselt

How your birthweight affects your further life

Did you know that being born with low birthweight (< 2.5 kg), increases the risk of a heart attack when you're 50 or older? Rossella Alfano (Uhasselt) examined 500 neonates and found out that babies with low birth weight have less HDL cholesterol, commonly known as 'good cholesterol'.
Ben
Rombaut
FWO
UHasselt

In search of the cause of Alzheimer's

In patients with Alzheimer's, microglia, the immune cells that protect our brains, suddenly start damaging the brain themselves by eating synapses. Ben Rombaut is trying to find out why this happens. In this way, he wants to help ensure that in our old age we can all stay on our toes.
Awadesh
Mallik
FWO
imec
UHasselt

Growing diamonds for cool electronics

Diamonds are not only a girl's best friend (M. Monroe), but they're also an engineer's best friend (A. Mallik). Awadesh Mallik (Universiteit Hasselt - imec) explains why that is and how engineers grow diamonds in the lab. ๐Ÿ‘จ๐Ÿฝโ€๐Ÿ”ฌ ๐Ÿ’Ž